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Use of LowBlueLights Eyewear Shows True Promise Controlling Manic Bipolar Episodes, Mood & Improving Sleep

March 2017

Richard L. Hansler PhD

Excitement is growing amongst psychiatrists & health practitioners after a landmark Norwegian study demonstrated individuals experiencing bipolar mania while utilizing LowBlueLights’ blue-blocking glasses showed marked improvement.  Manic patients were randomly provided either our specially designed 100% blue-blocking Sleep Glasses (test group) or clear (placebo group) glasses.  Both groups maintained their standard medical treatment however the test group was required to wear our unique blue-blocking glasses eventually retiring for the night in total darkness. The paper describing the results reports an immense difference between the two groups. Test patients showed remarkable improvement in just three days and were manic-free after just seven days while placebo patients showed little improvement over the same period.  Although a small study, each of 12 patients from the test group recovered whereas none of the 11 patients wearing placebo eyewear recovered following seven days.  A recent Newsweek article describing the study explains, ‘These are “knock-your-socks-off results,” says Dr. James Phelps, a researcher and psychiatrist with Samaritan Health Services in Corvallis, Oregon, who wasn’t involved in the study.’ 1 It’s conceivable these glasses may potentially prevent individuals with bipolar disorder from experiencing manic episodes in the future.  The Norway study also demonstrates individuals with bipolar disorder, while controlling light exposure via LowBlueLights’ eyewear, may also be helpful in controlling other mental health challenges as well as mood.

In general, to improve sleep and health, we recommend wearing our Sleep Glasses several hours before bedtime while maintaining a completely dark environment throughout the night.  A wide selection of blue-free lighting products is also available which create a virtual darkness allowing individuals to navigate safely around the home while doing normal activities.

An abstract of the study conducted by Norwegian Tone EG Henriksen is located here:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27226262

 

1Newsweek; 7/26/2016, Tech & Science: Blue-Blocking Glasses May Help Treat Bipolar Disorder, Promote Sleep.